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Title

Focus on Nutrients and Puget Sound: Nitrogen in surface water runoff to Puget Sound

 
Publication number Date Published
11-03-034June 2011
VIEW NOW: Focus on Nutrients and Puget Sound: Nitrogen in surface water runoff to Puget Sound (Number of pages: 2) (Publication Size: 119KB)




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Author(s) Roberts, M. and A. Kolosseus
Description The Department of Ecology and partners are evaluating levels of toxic chemicals and nutrients in the Puget Sound ecosystem. The surface runoff study focused on toxic chemicals but included nitrogen monitoring during storm events and between storms (baseflow). Sixteen small streams within the Puyallup and Snohomish River watersheds were monitored between August 2009 and July 2010. The streams were selected to assess the relative contributions from four land-cover types: commercial/industrial, residential, agricultural, and forested/field/other undeveloped land.
Total nitrogen levels were highest during storms from residential and agricultural land uses. Residential subbasins had the highest baseflow nitrogen concentrations.
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Keywords Snohomish River, focus, nitrogen, surface water, Puyallup, runoff, toxic, Puget Sound, nutrient
WATERSHED Water Resource Inventory Areas
(WRIA 07,WRIA 10)
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Toxics in Surface Runoff to Puget Sound: Phase 3 Data and Load Estimates

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